Destination Lake Powell

by Suz on August 8, 2012

 

For those who believe southern Utah and northern Arizona’s only tourist attractions are large numbers of secretive, polygamous, prairie-dress-wearing Mormans, I give you Lake Powell.  Created in the 1960’s by someone who apparently liked boating so much, they built the Glen Canyon Dam, damming up a good portion of the Colorado River…Mexicans and anyone else living south of the border be damned.

Those Mormans are pretty good at keeping secrets, so if you live east of the Continental Divide, I wouldn’t be surprised if you’d never heard of it.   Don’t feel bad.

My husband and I met our friends this past week and spent a few days frolicking through the canyon on our friend’s boat.  My husband would like it known that he has never and will never frolick, and was instead doing manly things such as wakeboarding.  I was doing decidely unmanly things such as sunbathing.  I’m aware sunbathing slathered in SPF 50 seems counter-intuitive, but it’s how I roll these days to keep the wrinkle demons away given I am of advanced age in my fourth decade of life.

 

I did get up the nerve to try wakeboarding.  But no one had a camera with a fast enough shutter speed to catch it on film.  Alas, I did not grow up around speedboats, and hanging on to a rope behind the family canoe did not give me the needed skills and/or strength to stand up on a moving board at 30 MPH for longer than 85.2 seconds…give or take 83 seconds.

There are millions, if not hundreds of different canyons to explore by boat.  I’d suggest a boat with an engine. Canoes are for overachievers who want to excercise.  Now that I’m on the topics of boats, I’d also suggest not going to Lake Powell without one.  You’ll get hot and think hateful and envious thoughts about the people tumbling off the slide from their houseboat into the lake.  The smart move is to have friends who own a boat.

If you’re entertaining thoughts of taking a vacation but feel guilt, take your (friend’s) boat to see the Anasazi Indian ruins, and write up the whole trip as “educational”.

I personally did not walk up to the ruins, because I only do “educational” in climate controlled indoor venues.  I don’t do “educational” in 95 degree heat when there is perfectly good water to sit in.  But one who is hardier than I, would have no problems.

It’s also educational in the sense of “What not to do if you don’t want to end up paralyzed and/or dead.” But if you DO have a desire to end up paralyzed or dead, sixty foot cliffs abound with suicide jumping opportunities.  I’ve since told my husband he lost his cliff jumping privileges when he married me three years ago.

 

 

 

I’ve traveled a fair bit, and seen some really beautiful places.  I’d say that this one definitely goes to the top of the list.  It was so beautiful and relaxing, I even managed to quell the guilt related to the poor Mexican’s who don’t have any water in their rivers because we dammed up the Colorado river.

For those not averse to the occasional speeding ticket, it’s only a seven hour drive from Denver or a five hour drive from Phoenix.  I’d give you the distance from Salt Lake City, but let’s be honest…if you were from Salt Lake city, you would’ve stopped reading after the first sentence.

What did YOU do on your summer vacation??

 

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